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v1.03 preface
v1.03 cover
v1.03 contents:
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The Celtic Art Coracle Volume 1 Issue 3
The Argument Against a Celtic Revival - Alexander Blair-Ewart

Whatever modern man since the Enlightenment may think of as history, it is obviously far from the truth. Dates may be known and theories bandied about by every shade of opportunist, but generally the causes of historically significant events are understood only in a superficial way. The idea, too, that we are capable of learning from "a history's mistakes" seems absurd in a world which sinks ever deeper into the quagmire of international conflict, ideological dissimulation and economic chaos.

During such periods of widespread unrest and danger, people look back to an ancient and imagined glorious past. If this interest reaches the proportions of a revival, it is often difficult for the world to assess the authenticity of the peculiar cultural aspects that the exponents of the revival have chosen to emphasize.

Mussolini's Italy, to cite an example, began with a revival of the idea of the ancient Roman empire, and the insistence that the glory of ancient Rome was to re- emerge in the twentieth century. At first, high- sounding phrases about the cultural splendor of the Italian past issued from the mouths of poets who were probably sincere in their praise of the great artists of bygone days. This did not, of course, stop the fascists from taking up this eloquent rhetoric and using it to lead the Italian people down the path of dictatorship and ruin.

continued

 copyright Alexander Blair-Ewart 1983 
 

The Celtic Art Coracle Vol 1
Contents Coracle Press 1983
ISSN 0828-8321 
All Rights Reserved
10.02.01edition
coracle@thecoracle.tripod.com

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