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v1.03 preface
v1.03 cover
v1.03 contents:
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The Celtic Art Coracle Volume 1 Issue 3
CELTIC ART - A LIVING TRADITION - Annie Wildwood (cont)

To the Celt and other migrational peoples, the body of the earth mother, the planet, was a living, breathing being and to claim any part as one's own territory so as to limit the free and natural interaction of her creatures with her, was an unholy (un-wholly) act.

Pushed here and there, diverted from the dance with the earth mother by those who chose to settle and claim, Celts preserved their sense of freedom by not identifying with the fragmentary aspects of civilization: they maintained a continuum of consciousness, as is reflected in their art.

Art, in those early times, served to mark the sacred, to record it in time. To call down the divine, by marking, inscribing, thereby giving it shape, was to magnify, empower and raise up the material; to make holy, to give wholeness to that which is separate. In modern day language and treatment, art becomes sacred when it serves to unite the separate sides of the brain, right and left, into a synthesis of intuition and logic, the sum of which is experienced as divine. 

This then, is the hidden gift of the Celtic peoples; for surely, the same indwelling earth rhythm that wove in them its nurturing ways can move us into our own migrations in consciousness as we re-enact their mark of it - Celtic Art.

content: copyright Annie Wildwood 1983
 

The Celtic Art Coracle Vol 1
Contents Coracle Press 1983
ISSN 0828-8321 
All Rights Reserved
10.02.01edition
coracle@thecoracle.tripod.com

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