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v1.10 preface
v1.10 cover
v1.10 index
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The Celtic Art Coracle Volume 1 Issue 10
Question and Answers from the Keltic Knots Course (cont)

The more complex form of split-ribbon is applied to the same knot used for the neck of a single bird on upper, right-hand side on page one.

A single bird's neck and head uses one strand of  of the Josephine knot, leaving a second strand loose, which is a mistake.

All strands of knotwork in an animal pattern must relate to some part of the animal's anatomy, usually the neck, tail, or topknot and sometimes a tongue.

At the lower left on folio1R, there is another, split-ribboned knot, based on a variation of the Josephine knot.

In this variation, one of the two breaklines is omitted, which changes the two circuits of the Josephine knot into a continuous single circuit.

This rectifies the mistake on the opposite corner. Instead of joining two Foundational knots, join one Foundational and one Solomon 's knot together - that is, a Josephine knot with only one breakline - for a single strand.

I think the reason for this "mistake" is that the scribe wanted to show the technique of knotwork design in the first few pages of the Book of Kells, deliberately leaving these clues for us.

 

Art: copyright Aidan Meehan 1983
 

The Celtic Art Coracle Vol 1
Contents Coracle Press 1983
ISSN 0828-8321 
All Rights Reserved
10.02.01edition
coracle@thecoracle.tripod.com

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