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The Celtic Art Coracle Volume 1 Issue 2 p. 24
Celtic Vision Robert O'Driscoll  page 1

cab024a.gif (8412 bytes)
Fig. 25: see p.28, below

When we use the words "Celtic Vision" we do not mean "Celtic" in a nationalistic, ethnic or racial sense, but to incorporate a wider frame of reference than is contained  within the boundaries of the Celtic world.

We see the Celt as representing the all- engulfing primal matrix from which a succession of European civilizations have emerged.

It may be that by focusing on that matrix, that the fragmentary aspects of recent European history can be made intelligible and perhaps reconciled.

We see the Celt as providing a counter to the materialistic consciousness that now dominates our modern world. The Celt does not conceive all knowledge as emanating from sense impressions or analytic science, but he tends to look upon nature and the material world as if at a spiritual thing expressing itself. He envisages the earth and all forms of life as holy and haunted. Accepting, too, the brevity of life, and the conditions of life, he strives not for mesmeric mastery of the outer world, not for the imposition of will or proliferation of empire, whether invisible or visible, but he seeks inner illumination and freedom and at all times seeks to accompany his observation of the external world with an intense spiritual awareness and a descent into the well of his own being.
continued next page

Artwork Aidan Meehan 1980
 

The Celtic Art Coracle Vol 1
Contents Coracle Press 1983
ISSN 0828-8321 
All Rights Reserved
10.02.01edition
coracle@thecoracle.tripod.com

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