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preface v1.02
cover v1.02
index v1.02
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The Celtic Art Coracle Volume 1 Issue 2 page 20 
SYMBOLISM OF THE DOT GRID Aidan Meehan

Fig. 21: one, two three, four dots
   In looking for meaning in Celtic art, one good place to start is the meaning of the dot grid. To make a pattern,  you  first  need to lay out a grid.
   A  rectangular or square grid, is the basis of most repeat patterns.
   The square grid results from a series of horizontal lines across a series of verticals, a sort of weaving, a net cast to pin down the dots.
   Though the mathematical point is beyond dimension, yet it defines and forms the lines, intersections and areas of the grid. All these elements are created in the act of drawing the grid.
   The grid may be used as a symbol of the fabric of the Universe, because the act of drawing a grid can become a meditation on the birth of the universe, a symbolic re-enactment of the birth of the universe. An empty page, for instance,  before the first point or line is drawn, may be considered as a symbol of the state of the universe before time began, full of potential.
Fig. 21:  one, two three, four dots.
Fig. 21a:  one dot
Fig 21a: one dot
Fig. 21b: two dots
Fig 21b: two dot
Fig. 21c:  three dots
Fig 21c: three dots
Fig. 21d:  four dots
fig 21d: four dots
Artwork Copyright Aidan Meehan 1983
 

The Celtic Art Coracle Vol 1
Contents Coracle Press 1983
ISSN 0828-8321 
All Rights Reserved
10.02.01edition
coracle@thecoracle.tripod.com

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