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v1.06 preface
v1.06 cover
v1.06 contents
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The Celtic Art Coracle Volume 1 Issue 6

Celtic Art in the Global Village 

Interlaced-work, key-patterns, spirals, and zoomorphs are to be found separately in the decorative art of many races and many periods, but nowhere and at no time have these different elements been used in combination with such consummate skill, as in the early Christian period in Great Britain and Ireland.  

- John Romilly Allen 1893

Celtic Art   is the art of decorated manuscripts and carved stones, metalwork and jewelry produced by various schools throughout Ireland and the British Isles during the Middle Ages (from the mid-seventh to the mid-twelfth century).  Collectively, these schools constitute the Insular school.

Yet, Celtic art is also a universal type of art, relevant to the modern world. Even during the golden age, Celtic art had an influence beyond the world of Celtic culture, as seen by early Carolingian illuminations which are often decorated with Insular knotwork.

Irish - or Irish-trained - scribes were waylaid by Charlemagne to brighten his libraries with their distinctive style of illumination, although the further they traveled from their island monasteries, the less Celtic became their knots.

In the courtly illuminations of the time, scribes produce knots with little grasp of the method, and a limited repertoire. This is why the knot designs in  the mid-eighth century Book of Kells have no parallel in Carolingian manuscripts.

Triple Spiral Roundel copyright The Coracle 1983

 

The Celtic Art Coracle Vol 1
Contents Coracle Press 1983
ISSN 0828-8321 
All Rights Reserved
10.02.01edition
coracle@thecoracle.tripod.com

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