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v1.06 preface
v1.06 cover
v1.06 contents
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The Celtic Art Coracle Volume 1 Issue 6
Celtic Art in the Global Village continued

This concern with form language preoccupies artists in every period of cultural renovation. In the early Middle Ages, Celtic scribes wove the three strands of interlace, maze-patterns and spirals into the form of Celtic art.

Five hundred years later, Islamic art hit upon the same three principles of surface division: knotwork, maze- patterns and spirals.

We too are in the midst of a cultural revolution. For over a century, artists have been searching for a universal form language of the decorative arts. We see this first with Art Nouveau and again with Art Deco. Celtic art could well be the basis of that very form language which these modern movements set out to invent.

Celtic art has never been obsolete, as a form of language it speaks across time, and articulates the language of primitive geometric forms so well that it will always be invaluabe to students of formal design. Threfore it is more accurate to speak of therecovery of Celtic art, rather than it's revival: it is actually self-regenerative.

The art of  early humanity - primitive geometric pattern - is embedded in Celtic art, and this became the art of our village-minded ancestors. Just as the future appears to hold no alternative but that of village life on a planetary scale, Celtic art will have a future part to play in the form of decoration with which that global village will need to be furnished.

Copyright The Coracle 1983

 

The Celtic Art Coracle Vol 1
Contents Coracle Press 1983
ISSN 0828-8321 
All Rights Reserved
10.02.01edition
coracle@thecoracle.tripod.com

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