Make your own free website on Tripod.com

164

Back ] Home ] Up ] Next ]

 

v1.11 preface
v1.11 cover
v1.11 contents
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176

 

The Celtic Art Coracle volume 1 issue 11
The Primordial Language of Ornament, Aidan Meehan
"The Primordial Language of Ornament, A. Meehan"

Looked at closely, the traditional ornaments on parchment and stone that have come down to us from the early Christian period in Northern Europe, as well as the knotwork of the Mediterranean, disclose an underlying unity: organized on grids; based on dots connected by lines in diamond-arrangements, as in knot design; or by lines in diagonal-cross arrangements, as in Celtic square-spiral or maze patterns.

The main constructions use age-old motifs that were indigenous to Eurasian cultures as far back as the Beaker and Axe peoples, at least, as demonstrated by Marija Gimbutas.

The structural unity of primitive ornament was outlined in the last century by J. Romilly Allen who revealed the syntax and the grammar of the form language of primitive patterns. While Romilly Allen drew largely from Beaker pottery design, Gimbutas has drawn evidence that the same pattern system was used extensively in Old European civilization. It is likely that when this system appears in pottery of the fifth millennium BCE,  it had already been fully developed as a syntax of symbolic geometry, a precursor to script.

Before going further into this, however, we need to revise our ideas about the nature of decorative art and of the symbolism of simple, primitive, geometric forms.

Copyright Aidan Meehan 1983. Renewed 2001
 

The Celtic Art Coracle Vol 1
Contents Coracle Press 1983
ISSN 0828-8321 
All Rights Reserved
10.02.01edition
coracle@thecoracle.tripod.com

Back ] Next ]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The text for this page is set for small screens. Adjust text size from your browser main menu bar; in Internet Explorer, press keys ALT-V-X