Make your own free website on Tripod.com

075

Back ] Home ] Up ] Next ]

 

v1.05 preface
v1.05 cover
v1.05 contents
065
066
067
068
069
070
071
072
073
074
075
076
077
078
079
080

 

The Celtic Art Coracle Volume 1 Issue 5
What's in the name, Molaise? 

Molaise Og , lettering by A. Meehan
Calligraphy: Molaise Og, in Angular Half-uncial script

The name breaks down into two Irish words, Mo Laise: Mo, meaning "my", and Laise, which is a proper name possibly related to the word for a calf. The final syllable is pronounced "sh" as in the name, Sean.

The prefix, Mo, is the equivalent of "my dear... " , and this affectionate diminutive, to use the technical name for it, is often used in the names of early Celtic saints. Another example is Mogue, whic, as Mo-Aedh-og, is the name Aedh, preceded by My, and followed by "Og", meaning "young", as in, "my dear young Aedh". 

Molaise was a common name in sixth century Ireland and Scotland. There was a Molaise of Devenish, and another - or possibly the same man - of Innismurray, off the coast of Donegal; there was a different Molaise of Arran, off the North East, with links to Iona, and an Abbot Laisrean of Iona, also. 

The latin form of the name of both Molaise and Laisrean (pro. Lazrann) is Laserian. 

Calligraphy Aidan Meehan 1983
 

The Celtic Art Coracle Vol 1
Contents Coracle Press 1983
ISSN 0828-8321 
All Rights Reserved
10.02.01edition
coracle@thecoracle.tripod.com

Back ] Next ]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The text for this page is set for small screens. Adjust text size from your browser main menu bar; in Internet Explorer, press keys ALT-V-X